dc.contributor.authorTeh, Xia Yin
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T06:18:18Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T06:18:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10356/71904
dc.description.abstractThe designer loves to create things and delving into the design process keeps her immensely satisfied especially when her work has an impact on others. Mujō is brought about by a personal curiosity and interest in how people broach end of life topics or rather, the lack thereof. Through further research, the findings show that not many Singaporeans are comfortable with broaching this sensitive topic as it is seen as a taboo in Singapore’s society and culture. As Singapore faces an ageing population, it is even more so for people to realise that they need to face this reality. Inspired by Weng Xinyu’s ‘Good Medicine Tastes Bitter’ series and readings on ‘Speculative Everything’ by Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, this project is intended to encourage dialogues regarding mortality instead of achieving a fully functional usable product product. Death is universal, thus the candle holder seeks to convey it simply and subtly without any religious implications. Through the metaphorical representation of the product and its effect, the outcome of this project is intended to encourage people to accept the impermanence of things.en_US
dc.format.extent39 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsNanyang Technological University
dc.subjectDRNTU::Engineering::Manufacturing::Product designen_US
dc.titleMujōen_US
dc.typeFinal Year Project (FYP)en_US
dc.contributor.supervisorChalit Kongsuwanen_US
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Art, Design and Mediaen_US
dc.description.degreeBachelor of Fine Artsen_US


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